Working with Panels in Photoshop CC

Working with Panels in Photoshop CCWorking with Panels in Photoshop CC is like eating in a fine, fine, fine restaurant when all you are having is a cracker and a glass of water. Think about it. You’re at a beautiful table with a white tablecloth. You have 4 glasses in front of you, all different shapes and sizes. You have 5 spoons and 4 forks. 3 knives. Then you have 4 plates and 3 bowls.

All you want is to eat your cracker and drink your water.

Where do you put your cracker? What do you use to eat it?

Working with panels in Photoshop CC is just like that. There is a lot of stuff on the table that you don’t need and will never ever use.

I have created a very special set up that I use when working with panels in Photoshop CC. I start out with the three panels, four if you count the tool bar, that I use all of the time. By default, Photoshop gives you their set of “Essential” panels. I launched especially for this video, “Working with Panels in Photoshop CC”, and reset the Essential panels to their default setting so that I could see all that was there.

Here is the list;

Tool Bar

Color

Swatches

Learn

Layers

Channels

Paths

Adjustments

Properties

Libraries

That’s ten panels. I took a screenshot with my image in it for this video. You can see half of my image over there on the left hand side.

Working with Panels in Photoshop CC

Most of the 10 essential panels you will never, ever use and some of them pop up all by themselves when you don’t want them to.

I created my own group of panels and gave this panel group the name, “Bill the Geek’s Place.” Now, when I open Photoshop, only 3 panels open. You see the picture below. And,,,,, check it out, I can see my whole picture.

Working with Panels in Photoshop CC

This video is how to help you clear your dining table, eat your cracker, drink your water and live in peace.Working with Panels in Photoshop CC